About lauragarrison

I'm Laura. I'm a science and art buff with an undying curiosity in the world around me. I believe that science and medicine doesn't have to be complicated and scary; it should be fun and utterly captivating. I hold a Master of Science in Biomedical Visualization from University of Illinois at Chicago and a Bachelor of Arts in Physiology from Northern Michigan University.

AMI Sourcebook 2016

 

I decided to take the plunge and take out an ad in the Medical Illustration 2016 Sourcebook! Since my work at my new gig is essentially all 3D, I’m marketing my freelance work towards that more than the 2D work I’ve mostly shown in the past. Looking forward to seeing it in print!
GarrisonStudios

Breast Complaint

Another illustration set completed, this time for the IHP Breast Complaint case and lesson series.

Breast Complaint

As usual, I started with models in Blender, modified the mesh as needed (the base model was a very, um, well-endowed woman), applied materials/textures, set up lighting, rendered, then brought into Photoshop for more painting, then into Illustrator for layout and labeling.

Just a plug for Blender – I’ve really enjoyed using this as my main general 3D program these days – it has a great feature set that has been, so far, pretty robust, and there’s a big community of users developing new features and plugins for the software. If you haven’t tried it and want to especially just dabble in 3D, give it a shot!

Testicular Cluster

testicular-clusterThe cluster fun continues! This finished series is for our Testicular Pain cluster, with the following pathologies, plus normal anatomy: indirect inguinal hernia, abnormal tunica vaginalis attachment, testicular torsion, epididymitis, testicular cancer, testicular self-exam, renal vs. ureteral pain distribution, prehn sign, and cremasteric reflex.

As with the shoulder cluster, everything started in 3D (Blender), was pulled into Photoshop for paintover and further editing, and finally brought into Illustrator for layout and labeling.

Shoulder Cluster

shoulder-cluster

Phew, this was a big project. I’ve just finished all of the media for our Shoulder Pain series cases and lessons. We wanted to show both real and “idealized” anatomy, so in addition to the illustrations we made sure to include x-rays, CTs, and MRIs where applicable. I think it makes for a much more complete learning experience!

Illustration process: I started with a base set of anatomical models in Blender, made model adjustments as needed to correct anatomy, applied and edited textures (either directly in Blender or in Photoshop), applied materials, set up my lighting, and rendered. Then I painted and edited heavily in Photoshop to get the look I wanted – you can see this especially in the muscles. Layouts and labels were added finally in Illustrator.

Flash

Exciting news – I’m starting a new job with a company downtown to create animations in Flash for the purpose of patient education. This is something I’m really excited to be doing; I’m happy to be not going the pharma route. Although I do respect and still enjoy projects that part of the industry, I feel more fulfilled working on the patient/medical education side of things.

I wanted to share my “audition” piece I did for the job; I’m pretty happy with how it came out, and excited to be doing more!

Humidifier from Laura Schwartz on Vimeo.

And in a similar vein, here is a (very) quick piece I did also in Flash, just for fun.

 

Painting with an iPad

A few weeks ago I joined the masses and bought an iPad. I got it pretty much for client work and as a way to show my illustration and animation portfolio around. Anyway, I heard through the AMI about this awesome app called Procreate, and I had to share. It’s essentially a miniature version of photoshop for the iPad, you can swap out brushes and textures, mix colors, work in layers, and play with flow, opacity, and line weight just like in photoshop. Returning to my all-time favorite topic of sea otters, this is my first painting using the app…I didn’t spend too long on it, it was more of an exercise, but I was excited to have done this basically just with finger paints.

Image

Responsive Web Design

I’ve recently begun working on a website redesign for a client with great ideas for an amazing product for medical education, but now feels that his site is in need of a facelift. With all the crazy things we can do with web nowadays, and our ability to view a website just about anywhere, it has become incredibly important to have a website with a responsive design. I say this feeling like a hypocrite, since my website is NOT like this, but hey, I’m working on it. Another hot thing in web design now is also the use of horizontal/vertical sliders – I am a huge fan of this look, and think it makes everything so much cleaner, but it can be difficult to organize into a responsive site.

Anyway, I found these links and tools that I found very helpful when creating my initial wireframes, and thought I’d share:

http://www.netmagazine.com/features/50-fantastic-tools-responsive-web-design [tons of neat tools, the link below is a pullout from this site]

http://www.thismanslife.co.uk/projects/lab/responsivewireframes/ [ experiment with how layouts are altered as the screen size changes]

http://onepagetheme.com/applying-responsive-layout-to-one-page-websites/ [ the link pretty much says it all ]